Lionesse Flat Iron | Color Melting – New Technique for Natural Looks
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Color Melting – New Technique for Natural Looks

Woman with red hair

Color Melting – New Technique for Natural Looks

Woman with red hair

There are numerous reasons why the top hair secrets of the pros remain hidden from the mainstream public, with the main one being that if they were to get out, a lot of these guys would be out of work. Because their profession calls for them to always be devising new innovations for gorgeous hair effects and styling enhancements, it’s what they do. Thankfully, a few of them are not very worried about being displaced by any home-based hair expert wannabes, so they are happy to keep us well-informed with the basics for the most current trending techniques and styles. Typically, these are the styling artists whose work is so highly revered that they’re the ones the celebs swear by. And now, for your reading pleasure, here’s the latest: Color Melting.

Color Melting, Defined
Ever since we learned about Ombre a few years ago, coloring techniques have been on a continuous stream of improving and outdoing themselves, one right after another. If you’re stumped by the technique’s name, don’t be. First, this kind of melting does not involve any heat source, with melting used to describe the effects of the color placement, only. In a nutshell, color melting is what you get when you take all of the top coloring techniques since ombre’s origin and put the best of them all together into one process and improve them beyond where they left off. And in a melting process that is superbly gradual and slow, colors are delivered to the hair strands that become lighter, with no exact discernable point where the color can be seen changing. Color melting succeeds at what every other technique has tried to do and has failed.

The How
In color melting, each highlight–regardless of color or hue–is blended with the hair’s base color first, and from there includes a multitude of softly progressive shades of the same color, which eliminates any telltale demarcation lines.

Making Pinks and Blues Appear Natural
This coloring technique has already hit big among celebs, with progressions softly blending silvery blond effects into gentle pinks, rich browns that fade down into teal-tinted blondes and intermingling of rich grays with subtle shades of violet-plums. On the more natural side, There are lovely caramelized effects that are richly dense with shade after shade, gently progressing just enough to absolutely rock the color.

Already A “Most Requested” Color Choice for Hollywood Heads
Among the stars who are being seen sporting this fresh, new technique are J.Lo–going for a more natural mix of goldens, blondes and rich caramels, and Hilary Duff’s sexy, exotic remake that includes a glam progression beginning with semi-dark roots that spill into light blonde silver, and turning into a well appointed violet pink proceeding all the way in melting fashion down her long, long tresses. Vanessa Hudgens was already killing this style a couple of years ago, working it all the way on her long and wavy locks color-melted by blond to aqua, and Rihanna’s waist-hitting ponytail ends are a softly subtle silver, while it’s impossible to see at which point they actually depart from the root color of black-brown sheen to go grey. Color melting so works.

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