Lionesse Flat Iron | Hair Fashions of the 1930s
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Hair Fashions of the 1930s

Fingerwave hairstyle

Hair Fashions of the 1930s

Fingerwave hairstyle

With the American nation buried deeply in a paralyzed economy of the Great Depression, a toll was taken on every aspect of life as it has been during the high times of the Roaring Twenties. There was nothing left unscathed, from the way everything had been done and even thought about. Hope was a scarcity when so many American families could not afford to buy anything, often missing much-needed meals and sufficient warmth from chilly winter temps. Thankfully, the end of the preceding decade had ushered in a new form of entertainment that surely sustained many a survivor of the Great Depression–and this new charm was the talking movie. Talking pictures were what they were commonly called, but these sound on movie films offered a wonderful escape to moviegoers from all walks of life. It is highly likely that the precise state of having so little prompted moviegoers to dive into these talking pictures with even more zeal. The leading ladies or heroines of screen fame became the representations of glamor and beauty. Wise directors knew that these new women of film and screen had to appear authentic–from attire and hair to the environment. Had these leading ladies been less believable or too fancy, they would have lost attendance and ultimately served to discourage moviegoers everywhere.

From the 20s to the 30s
Disappearing from female heads were those oh so adorable shingle bobs and fingerwaves of Flapper fixation, as hairdos made way for a less polished look, with far less “fuss.” Anyone in search of the prominent hairstyles of the 30s need look no further than to any of the leading screen stresses of the decade, who served as the iconic representation of styles that were certainly both achievable and functional at the same time. For many a 30s woman, staying blonde required a good measure of craftiness in using Clorox bleach, peroxide, Lux soap and ammonia to achieve the colorless color previously much easier for the public to come by. Softer curls were now brushed, and thus stood out further from the head and face, and the headbands that had previously been adorned by jewels, sequins and feathers were now replaced by more modest headwear in the form of hats with contained features and brims.

Typical Defining Elements of 1930s Hairstyle Features
Being blonde was big, along with fingerwaves that progressed downward in perfect uniform alignment–all to the right, then back to the left and again right, left and so forth, until the ends of the hair. The general range of hair length was always somewhere below the ear, with most cuts occurring somewhere along neck level, with a few memorable stars flaunting long, slick and straight hair that curled beautifully on the ends. Bangs and bang-less styles ran neck in neck, however, the side part was found in every styling effort now. Another standardized hairstyle component of the 1930s was the manner in which the hair would proceed from the part, flat and as straight as possible, until at some point it suddenly sprang to life in whatever manner of curls–waves or other deviations from straight–were the objective.

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