Lionesse Flat Iron | How Often Should You Replace Your Irons
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How Often Should You Replace Your Irons

woman having hair straightened

How Often Should You Replace Your Irons

woman having hair straightened

So you style your hair on a regular basis, right?  If you do, you’re likely using some sort of iron whether it’s a flat iron or curling iron chances are you’re using something to help style your hair the way that you want.  We often hear about cleaning and replacing things related to our makeup, but not often is it we hear of experts talking about replacing hair irons or how to clean them or care for them.  If you’re like us, you were a little confused or just thought those steps weren’t necessary with these types of items.  Well, we’re sharing how often you should replace your irons so you’re fully informed moving forward.

First things first, the most common factor that comes into play with replacing your irons is how often you actually use them.  If you’ve had an iron for a couple years but just used it a couple times you’re not necessarily going to need to replace it just because you’ve had it for a while.  There are different factors that play into damaging your irons and causing you to need to replace them.  How often you use them is the first thing, but also if you dye or color your hair – that can play a role in damaging your irons as well, in addition if you use your irons while your hair is wet vs. dry that can also factor into damage.  Essentially, your actual hair and how often you use your irons play major roles in how damaged your irons can become leading you to need to replace them.

If you’re not sure if you need to replace your irons, there are some things to look for that can show that the irons have damage to them.  The first thing to notice is how quickly your iron(s) take to actually heat up.  If they start to take a long time to heat (more than before) it can be an indication that your iron has damage to it.  In addition, if you find you have to continue to rise the temperature setting of your iron(s) that’s another sign of damage a lot of times.  Finally, if you find that your iron(s) aren’t giving you the look that you want (straight or curly) without needing to continuously run the iron through your hair over and over that’s often another sign that iron has damage to it.

If you find that your irons have some of these indications, it’s suggested that you start to look for another iron replacement.  When you continue to use an iron that has damage, it can then start to cause damage to your hair.  Since we know you don’t want that, it’s best to get that replacement on deck.  So really, there’s no hard answer when it comes to how often you should replace your irons, it depends on a lot of factors that are pretty personal and dependent upon the use/user.

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