Lionesse Flat Iron | How to Avoid Brassy Hair
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How to Avoid Brassy Hair

Woman dyeing her hair.

How to Avoid Brassy Hair

Woman dyeing her hair.

One of the most frequent sources of remedy-seeking calls made to the beauty hotlines and the rest is from desperate people who, in an effort to go blonde, somehow wound up orange, pinky-orange, brassy or some other non-blonde color that is nothing closely resembling the color of hair on the head of the model pictured on the box. While some folks are at least smart enough to stop here and seek professional mitigation, there are quite a few brazen others who, taking matters into their own unprofessional hands, try to fix their mistake, and in doing so, often wind up producing colors and hues that appear even further away from blonde on any color chart.

Bleaching Causatives
The source of brassiness is not always a direct product of a dye job– well, at least not immediately following the process. Sometimes, it’s a bit later on that the brass hue begins to appear, growing more and more in boldness with time. Often, the possibility of producing a brass effect directly correlates to how dark, or far away from blonde the person’s natural hair coloring is. In other words, someone with black hair will have a much greater tendency of a brassy final product than someone with dark to medium blonde hair who is wanting to go to a lighter shade of blonde. Darker hair has more pigment, and the more pigment there is needing to be lifted, the more challenging it is for the colorant to adequately lift the darker colors. This is where you should either really know your stuff or seek the services of a professional hair colorist with enough successful color lifting experience on darker haired clients. The better the color is lifted in the initial process, the less likely it will be to turn brassy at any later point.

Improper Care of Your Color
Aside from processed brassiness, there are a lot of ways in which you can aggravate or prevent having a brassy color of blonde locks.
Stay away from the color red, in any hair care product, no matter how you might need to use any of the sort in a pinch. One time can produce lasting results.

Shampoos that you use on lightened hair should be either formulated expressly to support the color of your hair, and/or be free of a lot of harsh detergent-type ingredients. They should be gentle and not contain any ingredients known to interfere in any way with your achieved color. Stay clear of parabens, sulfates and shampoos containing silicones, as these all can strip away that lovely color and turn it to brassiness. Believe it or not, a violet toned shampoo is going to be your best bet for blonde hair. The violet perfectly counteracts any brassiness, and will not leave any purple–or purple undertones in your hair.

Steer clear of all innocent, in-between processing products that bear any claims of having hair lightening potential, for all the reasons you might imagine–even something as seemingly innocuous as lemon juice can prove disastrous to chemically lightened hair.

Let’s keep the word “brass” where it belongs–either when referring to home furnishings, machine fittings or the symphony.

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